mtp in action

22 07 2010

Operation Omid do, Afghanistan. ANA Brigade Commander Col Sheren Shan Koradi and his staff planned and led the operation . 500 ANA troops moved into the area of Yakchal Southeast of Gereshk . An area of insurgent activity the aim was to show the ANA , with ISAF support , can bring security to the area . The ANA have been trained and mentoured by the 1 st Bn ( Royal Scottish Borderers ) (The Royal Regiment of Scotland ) . The Commanding officer of the Bn is Lt Col Charlie Herbert OBE

ANA Brigade Commander Col Sheren Shan Koradi and his staff planned and led the operation . 500 ANA troops moved into the area of Yakchal Southeast of Gereshk .   An area of insurgent activity the aim was to show the ANA , with ISAF support , can bring security to the area .   The ANA have been trained and mentoured by the 1 st Bn ( Royal Scottish Borderers ) , (The Royal Regiment of Scotland ) . The Commanding officer of the Bn is Lt Col Charlie Herbert OBE , Picture shows members of the 1st Battlion of the Royal Scottish Borderers ( The Royal Regiment of Scotland ) and members of the Afghan National Army patrolling into Yakchal Southeast of Gereshk .

Image shows: Lance Corporal Michael McLoughlin cleaning a cut on a local boy's hand with the water from his camelbak drinking system.  Lance Corporal (LCpl) Michael "Doc" McLoughlin is a medic with the Royal Army Medical Corps attached to The Royal Dragoon Guards. He is currently serving with a ground holding unit on the frontline against the Taliban in the southern district of Nad-e-Ali. The patrol base was seized as part of operation Moshtarak early in the year.    LCpl McLoughlin (22) from Manchester is the first line of medical support for the soldiers of C Squadron Royal Dragoon Guards who are currently operating as an infantry unit for their six-month tour of Afghanistan. The patrol base is some two kilometres from other ISAF locations. It regularly comes under fire from insurgents, as do the soldiers who patrol the surrounding area to provide protection and security for the local villagers.

Gurkhas from B Company The 1st Battalion Royal Gurkha Rifles provide security for Royal Engineers who are constructing a new road called Route Trident. The new road will allow greater movement for the local Afghans population and help to improve security in the area of Walizi, Helmand Province.    NOTE TO DESKS:   MoD release authorised handout images.   All images remain crown copyright.   Photo credit to read - Sergeant Ian Forsyth RLC

British troops on patrol

Gurkhas from B Company The 1st Battalion Royal Gurkha Rifles provide security for Royal Engineers who are constructing a new road called Route Trident. The new road will allow greater movement for the local Afghans population and help to improve security in the area of Walizi, Helmand Province.    NOTE TO DESKS:   MoD release authorised handout images.   All images remain crown copyright.   Photo credit to read - Sergeant Ian Forsyth RLC

Gurkhas from B Company The 1st Battalion Royal Gurkha Rifles provide security for Royal Engineers who are constructing a new road called Route Trident. The new road will allow greater movement for the local Afghan population and help to improve security in the area of Walizi, Helmand Province.     NOTE TO DESKS:   MoD release authorised handout images.   All images remain crown copyright.   Photo credit to read - Sergeant Ian Forsyth RLC

The Improvised Explosive Device is the biggest threat to life for troops on the ground in Afghanistan.  Scattered throughout Helmand Province, these indiscriminate weapons kill and maim both ISAF and Afghan soldiers as well as innocent Afghan civilians.    But the tide is turning in the fight against IEDs and the British Armed Forces now have a revolutionary new capability called Talisman which is being used to counter the threat.    15 Field Support Squadron, 21 Engineer Regiment who are based in Ripon, North Yorkshire, are the first troops to use the new system on the ground in Afghanistan.    Talisman is comprised of armoured vehicles, optical cameras and remote controlled vehicles.  This life saving equipment is being used to support Combat Logistics Patrols which can be up to several hundred vehicles in total which trek through the country, delivering vital supplies to bases for the troops on the front line.  Talisman is also starting to be used in combat infantry roles, such as for deliberate route clearances.

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image of the day

23 04 2010
"1 Mercians patrol in Helmand in their new MTP uniforms. Note PECOC 'Hybrid DPM' Osprey armour cover."

1 Mercians patrol in Helmand in their new MTP uniforms. Note PECOC 'Hybrid DPM' Osprey armour cover.

Here’s a close up of that armour carrier, clearly showing the Hybrid DPM in bottle green, caramel and earth brown over tan:

"Hybrid DPM Osprey"





multi-tarn?

2 03 2010

It appears that German military clothing and equipment manufacturers Tacgear have a new flecktarn colourway up their sleeve. The company made a splash a couple of years ago with their snow camouflage, based on the the drawings or printing screens used for the Danish army 3 colour woodland camouflage (‘M84’).  Now they have quietly announced

a new “flecktarn” camouflage pattern which was developed for the today’s mission scenarios of the armed forces

"alphacam"

Only one picture on their site, and that’s a small one, but it looks like they’ve used a Multicam-like palette (a colour scheme that’s bound to increase in popularity now that both the US and British armies have adopted it for their Afghan adventures). Maybe there will be more evidence at this year’s IWA and outdoor classics show in 2 weeks time.





acu is great

22 02 2010

I couldn’t let this amusing picture from a few years back pass without comment. So, for those who didn’t already see it on Soldier Systems:

"acuisgreat"





multicam makes the cut in the dirtbox

22 02 2010

Following a pre-emptive announcement on Soldier Systems on Feb 17th, the US Army confirmed that it will be fielding Crye’s Multicam pattern in Afghanistan, replacing the maligned Universal Camouflage Pattern (UCP) and effectively ending trials of a recoloured derivative, UCP-D, that attempted to resolve some of the concealment issues around UCP by adding a fourth, earth (‘Coyote’) brown colour.

The Army Times has this:

By Matthew Cox – Staff writer
Posted : Sunday Feb 21, 2010 9:07:31 EST

The Army will begin fielding MultiCam, a more effective camouflage pattern for Afghanistan, in August. Soldiers deploying in late summer will be the first to receive the new versions of the Army Combat Uniform; soldiers already in theater will begin getting them in the fall.

MultiCam, made by Crye Precision LLC, bested the existing digital pattern and others in multiple Army tests.

MultiCam was “21 percent less detectable than UCP,” the pattern used in ACUs, said Col. Bill Cole, project manager for Soldier Protection and Individual Equipment.

“MultiCam was the clear winner,” he said.

Army Chief of Staff Gen. George Casey was convinced of MultiCam’s effectiveness based on that statistic, Cole said.

“He’s an infantryman … when he saw that, he said, ‘You mean I can get this much closer to the enemy before I’m seen?’” Cole said. “That’s what he wanted.”

Secretary of the Army John McHugh approved Casey’s recommendation Feb. 19.

The 4th Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, at Fort Polk, La., and the Iowa National Guard’s 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 34th Infantry Division, will be the first to receive MultiCam. The new uniforms will also feature other improvements slated to be incorporated in all future ACUs over time, including an improved collar and buttons to replace some Velcro.

Soldiers will receive four sets of MultiCam uniforms, four combat shirts and matching combat gear, Cole said.

“Anything they would wear on a dismounted combat patrol will be in MultiCam,” Cole said.

The Feb. 19 announcement came after a multiphase effort that culminated with soldiers from Fort Bragg, N.C., Fort Campbell, Ky., and Fort Drum, N.Y., evaluating hundreds of calibrated photos of the Army’s Universal Camouflage Pattern and five alternative patterns taken in different settings in Afghanistan.

"021710at_multicam_2_800"

Soldiers wearing Multicam

So is MultiCam a step backward, returning camo design  to old-skool analogue patterns with swirly woodland shapes? Not at all! While it is not a pixellated pattern like UCP, the Marine’s MarPat, or Canada’s CadPat, it is still a digital designed pattern, and is far more advanced than any camo fielded in the 1980s and ’90s. Its design takes advantage of improvements in computer software that were unimaginable in the days of the Cold-war, allowing a complex pattern to be assembled from many different overlapping images, with colours tweaked to match environmental samples at the touch of a button. Before it was even printed, the concept was validated using sophisticated simulations of the pattern in different environments.





image of the day

10 02 2010
"LCpl Ross MacDougall, 1st Battalion Scots Guards, provides force protection during a CASAVAC Training Exercise during 4 Mechanized Brigade's Mission Specific Training (MST) on Salisbury Plain."

Picture: Sergeant Dan Harmer RLC, Crown Copyright/MOD 2010

Desert DPM: the British Army’s secret new-old multi-terrain camouflage!





image of the day

8 02 2010

Ordinarily, the last place you would expect to wear desert camo. However, believe it or not, Brit desert DPM is a good match for the dead stalks of winter grass.

"4 Mech Bde, Otterburn, 2009"

Picture: Corporal Jim Barron RLC, Crown Copyright/MOD 2010